North Shore Labor Council, AFL-CIO

 

The Massachusetts AFL-CIO is proud to endorse the following candidates with contested races in the general election on November 6th.

Gebre was still a boy when he was forced to flee Ethiopia, a country that suffered political turmoil and famine during the 1980s.

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It’s been nearly six months since National Grid locked 1,250 skilled gas workers out of their jobs and cut them off from their health insurance. Now these workers are in serious danger of losing the only source of income keeping their families afloat: Unemployment Insurance. National Grid wants to force families into economic insecurity in order to enhance their bargaining leverage. We can’t let that happen – here’s how you can help: Take a minute to call and email your State Senator and State Representative, and let them know that families are depending on them to extend their Unemployment Insurance benefits throughout the winter by passing H.3133 & S.1028 “An Act to Protect Locked Out Employees.”


Use this form to send an email to your legislators. Feel free to personalize the text. Please take a minute to call as well.

Recent News

1. Janus dealt a heavy blow to labor—but public-sector unions didn’t crumble overnight.

In June, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited ruling in Janus v. AFSCME—and it was just as bad as everyone feared. In a 5-to-4 decision, the court found that public-sector unions violated the First Amendment by collecting so-called fair-share fees from workers who aren’t union members but benefit from collective bargaining regardless.

A federal employee union sued the Trump administration Monday over the government shutdown, claiming it is illegal for agencies to force employees to work without pay.

Last week was a bad week for autoworkers and the future of our domestic industry. On Nov. 26, General Motors (GM) announced its decision to halt production at the Lordstown, Ohio, and Hamtramck, Mich., assembly plants, idling thousands of workers.

A series of settlements hammered out over the past few weeks between Marriott and its striking workers in Boston and seven other cities are ushering in groundbreaking benefits that could set a precedent not just for the service industry but for workers nationwide.

The Boston agreement, reached after workers spent more than six weeks on the picket lines, marching and chanting in the wind and rain and snow, includes a roughly 20 percent increase in wages over 4½ years, a 37 percent increase in pension contributions, and six weeks of paid maternity leave, plus two weeks for spouses.